Traveling with cats

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2014-12-28 14.46.36So my husband and I have two darling cats and every year they make the grand trip 2.5 hours to my parents house for Christmas. The old girl has done this two times before but the kitten is new to the trip. We are currently about 1/3 of the way there and have already learned some important life lessons.

– Bringing two cats does not make it easier. The cats will not keep each other company. They do not comfort one another. At all.
– Covering the cat carrier only makes the young one more agitated. Agitated cats yowl  continually.
– If there is a place you do not want your cat,  it will gravitate there like debris caught in the pull of a black hole.
– You can’t drown out the cats by turning up the music. They take this as a challenge.
– Eventually,  if your cat will give up. Don’t expect this to be calming for you or the cat. The cat may go completely limp and you may have to take a moment to make sure your feline hasn’t shaken this mortal coil.
– A cat, when stressed,  sheds a lot. If the older one isn’t bald by the time we reach our destination it will be a miracle.

I am sure there is still much to learn from the fur babies currently having a staring contest in the back seat. The elder isn’t in a carrier and seems to be mocking the younger in her tiny plastic prison.

I shall continue to watch how this little social hierarchy works out. Merry Christmas and Happy holidays.

AI

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Contract Social Media – Becoming an Authoritative Voice in an Unknown Land

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Writing It’s a brave new world, my friends.

Since Nov. 8, 2014, I have been providing social media services (mostly Twitter and blog content) for Hogg Mechanical, a company  based in Kitchener, Ont. When I began this contract I wrote a post on this blog about my fear and how it kept me motivated. After two weeks of hard work and a lot of research I finally feel like I have a better idea of what I need to do to create effective content. I have received positive feedback from the company and am having a meeting to discuss a more aggressive approach to their social media campaign. I would say these are all very good signs that I am doing what is expected of me or more.

There is one hitch, though: I still know very little about HVAC as a trade.

This was the basis of my fear when I took over the social media contract; I was worried that my writing would show lack of knowledge. I was tweeting and blogging for a company with over 130 years of experience – I had to sound like I knew my stuff. Knowing this, I started researching. Over the past two weeks I have learned more about this trade than I ever expected in a lifetime. I read, I searched infographics, I went to the library, I Googled every little thing. I checked and double checked my information. It was stressful as sin but it worked. I was able to produce meaningful content with an air of familiarity that I didn’t quite yet feel.

The next thing I did was relied on my social media know-how. I know people react more to funny tweets than serious. I know a picture of a puppy in a parka will get more retweets than plain text. I know that people like bright infographics and links to interesting videos. Sifting through the junk can be a trial but it is so rewarding once you find that perfect piece of media.

I started interacting, asking questions on the twitter feed and on Facebook. I inquired what people wanted to know more about. Crowdsourcing gave me at least a month worth of blog topics.

Relying on your skills is wildly important. Research can’t be topped when it comes to the hard facts and as always, remember that social media is exactly that – social. Question your audience so you can give them what they want.

It has been a crazy couple weeks but I wouldn’t trade them for anything. I am writing with passion and confidence while learning about something I never would otherwise.

I would love to hear your stories about new contract jitters! Leave a comment or reach out to me on Twitter (@idlehands85) and share your experiences!

AI

Writing – openening the emotional spigot

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It happens every time I start writing a large amount regardless of age, experience or time with pen in hand.

What am I talking about?

The emotions that come with writing, of course!

Any creative mind can tell you that art in every form is a sort of emotional endeavour. The emotions bubble to the surface and sometimes have the unfortunate tendency to boil over.

I recently broke months of writer’s block and am living again in the creative head space. This is wonderful in terms of productivity but horrible for my sleep patterns. When creativity hits I have to get up and write. It seems my most productive hours are still between midnight and 2:00 a.m. Worse still, once I have finished my writing I immediately start running it over in my head, figuring out how to evoke the proper tone and emotion from the piece. By the time I get my brain to settle down I am exhausted.

And when I write about emotional events…

When I am creative I open myself up to a lot of energies, both positive and negative. I am extremely empathetic and find that when working on emotionally charged pieces, happy or sad, i tend to strongly mirror those emotions. This week has been a sad one with the passing of W.O. Patrice Vincent and Cpl. Nathan Cirillo in two brutal acts of violence. The country has reeled and I have been crafting a piece about the cultural mosaic that is Canada (moreover how one bad piece does not ruin the entire picture) and have have had to step back again and again as news and pictures flood the media. My heart breaks for these families. As well I have been working on an essay about the impact of being bullied as a teenager. This piece was very cathartic but has also left me very depressed after looking at the plights of my younger self. Both are emotionally charged pieces and both have caused me to lose sleep.

My point is every time I put pen to paper I end up opening my heart a little wider; exposing myself a little bit more. It comes part and parcel with my ability to write. The proof is in the rambling paragraphs you just read; I am writing while mentally working through the first draft of my bullying essay. It is making me feel anxious, frustrated and scattered and that is translating directly into this blog post.

It is not a trait I can turn on and off and it can make life interesting, to say the least.

AI

Cirillo/Vincent article:

https://ca.news.yahoo.com/memorial-held-montreal-soldiers-patrice-vincent-nathan-cirillo-193539769.html

A/N The full bullying essay will be up once it has been subjected to the editing process (also known as the red pen of doom).

A poetic twist… or a twisted poet

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For those who don’t know, my partner in crime is a composer who is constantly looking for inspiration. One of the issues he runs into on a fairly regular basis has to do with lyrics; more specifically, copyright issues. Matt likes to look to poetry for his choral inspiration and regularly falls into the trap of not being able to use a beautiful piece due to copyright law.

This issue has led to Matt haranguing me to write him some poetry to set to music. When I asked him if he had a topic in mind, his answer was “not having to pay royalties” (and before you get mad fellow writers, he was joking. I would get my cut not to mention the ability to call myself a choral lyricist). Well, this is what I came up with – the first two verses were off the cuff and sang at him from the opposite end of the couch – the rest was a in a love note for him the following morning. I would call this a second draft as I have gone through to change some wording and phrasing to better the flow:

(also, my strength is prose)

Roses are red,
Violets are pretty,
Please move me the hell
back into the city!

This town is too boring
This place so mundane,
I fear living out here
Will drive me insane.

I miss all the noise,
All the culture and rabble;
My idea of fun
Isn’t Sunday night Scrabble.

Please let’s just move
To somewhere less quiet
So you don’t have to sit
Through my one-woman riot.

So Please, do remember
It would be a pity
To have me stay here,
And not live in the city.

Check him out at www.matthewdonnellymusic.com

AI

Bits and drabbles, or how to start writing again (Writer’s block)

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Any writer can point you to notebook on notebook of half-baked ideas and aborted plot lines that once showed promise but quickly lost steam. It’s a writer’s badge of honour and source of shame; we have all of these great ideas, but so few see their way to completion. I have countless journals spanning a decade and a half full of partially formed concepts and wild ramblings and I will admit, some of those ideas were downright atrocious. Some, though, have a degree merit and now that I am a few years removed from the initial concept, the ideas actually seem like a wonderful jumping-off point. I will promise that almost, if not all, of these ideas will never go farther than simple writing exercises but they are worth revisiting regardless.

Every writer takes a break between drafts – it helps to look at something with fresh eyes. It’s also why we have that brutally honest friend/ relative/ editor with the angry red pen look over our work. Fresh eyes make all the difference. If we can see something in a completely new light just by working through first and second drafts, why wouldn’t we be able to gain inspiration from ideas that previously ran into dead ends?

Writer’s block hits us all at inopportune times; when we want to write most is the exact moment that our creative minds go out to lunch. Next time this happens, visit some of your old notebooks or some abandoned stories on your hard drive. Take a look at these bits and drabbles and figure out why you thought the original concept deserved expansion. See what went right and what went wrong, then take the idea and write it down on a fresh sheet of paper (or in a new Word document) and see where it takes you. It will get you writing and maybe push you toward your next big idea.

I dealt with writer’s block for about six months this year (check the gap in my posts for an idea of the time frame) and have finally come out the other side. It took a lot of work and a lot of frustration (not to mention self-doubt) but I am here writing and that’s what is important. The stuff I have written recently has not been my best work – far from it, actually – but revisiting my past successes and failures and reviewing some of the things that didn’t work has helped me to get back on the horse, so to speak.

I hope this is helpful to some of my fellow writers. Good luck and never stop carrying your handy-dandy notebooks!

AI

In a coma

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Today while I was driving to pick up a bit of lunch, I was nearly hit by a car that crossed the centre line. Thankfully, some quick manoeuvrings and a very close call later I was still breathing. My adrenaline was pumping, my heart was racing and I felt very “alive.”

This started me thinking: what if I hadn’t actually avoided the accident? In an alternate reality, what if I had been put into a coma due to the accident and the day-to-day that I was living was actually just a dream.

Then I thought, hey, that’s a story!

Then I wondered if this was a normal way to think…

… then I realized that I really didn’t care. I love how my brain creates these bizarre scenarios.

AI

Eww

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Certain words carry a lot of context.

I have said before and will again that the English language, like all  languages, is able to convey so many different thoughts and feelings through a careful selection of words. To say that one is disappointed is very different from frustrated, angry or aggravated. While each word carries a tone of displeasure, the nuances make their meanings wildly different. Similarly, take an emotion like being happy. Saying that someone is happy is different from saying they are joyous, ecstatic or enthralled. Each word is a happy descriptor denoting different ranges within the emotion. Careful word choice has the power to evoke strong and very specific reactions from an audience.

On the same note, one word can mean so much. One word can break down into so many different meanings that are all encompassed in that one utterance. One such word is “Eww.” It’s just a three-letter word, an interjection, but it can carry such force that it is not a word to be taken lightly.

I recently heard a person of my acquaintance mutter this monosyllable under her breath regarding another human being. Initially I was surprised and a little angry at the sentiment, but as I thought about it, I became downright furious.

First off, she was talking about another human being; not garbage, a gross-looking spill or some excrement on the bottom of her shoe – a flesh-and-blood human being – moreover, one that she doesn’t really know. Judged on face value, this person chose to voice her distaste in one of the rudest ways I can imagine.

I am glad the other person did not hear this statement because I DO know the person and he is one of the sweetest, kindest, hardest-working men, not to mention a phenomenal husband and father. She made a knee-jerk reaction based on one instance using a very small but very strongl word.

Let me tell you what the term “Eww” brings to mind for me:

  1. Distaste at something assaulting one of your five senses.
  2. Dismissal of all other traits or –
  3. An encapsulating statement taking into account all aspects of the person, place or thing.
  4. A feeling of disgust and a want to remove the person, place or thing from your immediate area.

Eww, in this context, is all-encompassing and short-sighted. It does not take into account all of the things this man is but dismisses him on one or two traits that this woman found unappealing.

Words have the power to scar. To hear that said about yourself would be emotionally devastating; take it from the veteran of enough schoolyard abuse to be any psychologist’s dream cash-cow. Honestly, if I hadn’t had such support outside those situations, I would be a seriously broken person. I have been called ugly, fat, gross and any other plethora of nasty things. All of those things are summed up in “Eww.”

Awful.

Disliked.

Unwanted.

No one should have to deal with that kind of abusive language anywhere. The word may sound innocuous enough, but it carries some true weight.

Enough weight to make someone question themselves; to hate themselves.

I guess the point I am trying to make is that while a word may seem fairly banal, its impact can leave a lasting impression. Also, that some are two quick to judge with sweeping comments and strong statements that could seriously hurt others.

I look back and wish I had said something to this woman. Maybe next time she would think before passing judgement.

Words can be dangerous.

Carefully chosen words can have a huge impact.

Careless words can carry unexpected consequences.

So in writing, as in speech, choose your words carefully.